Why Should I Use
Surge Protection?

 

Surge Protection for Your Phone System

What are electrical surges and where do they come from?

The main task of a surge protector is to protect electronic devices from “power surges.” A power surge, or transient voltage, is an increase in voltage significantly above the designated level in a flow of electricity. In typical home/office wiring, the standard voltage is 120 volts; if voltage rises above 120, the surge protector helps protect your electronic device.

The most familiar source is probably lightning, though it's actually one of the least common causes. When lightning strikes near a power line, whether it's underground, in a building or running along poles, the electrical energy can boost electrical pressure by millions of volts. This causes an extremely large power surge that will overpower almost any surge protector. In a lightning storm, you should never rely on your surge protector to save your computer. The best protection is to unplug your computer.

A more common cause of power surges is the operation of high-power electrical devices, such as elevators, air conditioners and refrigerators. These high-powered pieces of equipment require a lot of energy to switch on and turn off components like compressors and motors. This switching creates sudden, brief demands for power, which upset the steady voltage flow in the electrical system. While these surges are nowhere near the intensity of a lightning surge, they can be severe enough to damage components, immediately or gradually, and they occur regularly in most building's electrical systems.

Other sources of power surges include faulty wiring, problems with the utility company's equipment, and downed power lines.

Phone systems need dual protection

Even if you protect your business phone system with an electrical power surge protector, it is also exposed to damaging surges from other sources.  Telephone and internet lines can also conduct high voltage, so for full protection you should also guard against surges from your phone and cable lines.  Essentially, any lines carrying signals into your phone system can carry a power surge and can  cause just as much damage as surges over power lines.

 

Surge protectors for phone lines can be separate devices and can also be integrated into an AC power surge protector. For instance, the ITW Linx MCO4X4 is a surge protector that will protect from surges over incoming phone lines. It has a modular design that allows you to attach it to the M4KSU AC power surge protector.  By using this configuration both units can share the ground circuit, and you protect against surges over phone lines and power lines.  The ITW Linx M8COM is an integrated unit that includes AC power surge protection as well as incoming telephone line and LAN line protection

 

TIME CHANGE

INSTRUCTIONS

Most businesses will make 2 changes per year from Standard Time, in the spring, to Daylight Saving Time, in the Fall. Below are step by step instructions for this process, see instructions below. If you encounter any issues, let us know!

**If your system is not listed, or you do not know the type, e-mail us.

NEC SV8100 & SV9100

1. Press Speaker
2. Dial "#*#*"
3. Password: "0000"
4. Press Transfer
5. Dial "100101"
6. Enter 2-digits for the year, than press transfer.
7. Enter 2-digits for the month, than press transfer.
8. Enter 2-digits for the day, than press transfer.
9. Enter 2-digits for the day of the week, than press transfer.
10. Enter 2-digits for the hour, than press transfer.
11. Enter 2-digits for the minute, than press transfer.
12. Enter 2-digits for the second, than press transfer.
13. Press Answer.
14. Press Answer.
15. Press Speaker.

NEC UX5000

1.From the System Administrator's telephone (normally extension 301), press CALL1 and dial 828.
2.Dial two digits for the hour (24 hour)
    For example, 13=1:00 PM.
3.Dial two digits for the minutes.
    You hear confirmation beeps.
4.Press SPK to hang up.

NEC SV8300 / NEAX 2000 IVS / 2000 IVS-2 / 2000 IPS

With Dterm Series III, Series E and Series i Phones
**CAT Mode Procedure: This is to be done while the phone is in an idle state.
Press "TRANSFER"
Press "CONF"
Press "*"
Press "TRANSFER"
Press "CONF"
Press "#"
"CAT MODE" displayed on LCD
Press "REDIAL or LNR/SPD"
"COMMAND" displayed on LCD
Press "02"
Press "RECALL"
Press "2"
Press "RECALL"
"02>2>Current Time" displayed on LCD
Input correct time using Military Time (HH MM SS)
Press "CONF"

 


NEC Electra Professional Level I, Level II, Level II Advanced,
Electra Pro 120, Electra Elite 48, Electra Elite 192

**Changing the time on a Electra Elite & Professional system must be done from the "main" or primary phone. It is usually extension # 100.
1. Press "FEATURE"
2. Dial "9#"
3. Enter hour and minute
4. Press "RECALL" to change AM/PM setting
5. Press "HOLD" to change the calendar setting
6. Press "RECALL" to change the day of week
7. Dial "#" to move the cursor to day of month field
8. Enter day of month
9. Press "RECALL" to select month
10. Dial "#"to move the cursor to year field
11. Enter last 2 digits of year
12. Press "FEATURE"
 

If you encounter any issues, let us know!

If your system is not listed, or you do not know the type, e-mail us.

 
 

NEC SV8100

TO DOWNLOAD THE USER GUIDE FOR

YOUR SV8100 PHONE SYSTEM,

SELECT BELOW

NEC SV9100

TO DOWNLOAD THE USER GUIDE FOR

YOUR SV9100 PHONE SYSTEM,

SELECT BELOW

 
 

NEC UX5000

TO DOWNLOAD THE USER GUIDE FOR YOUR UX5000 PHONE SYSTEM, SELECT BELOW

NEC ASPIRE

TO DOWNLOAD THE USER GUIDE FOR YOUR ASPIRE PHONE SYSTEM, SELECT BELOW

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Headquarters

Nobel Systems, inc.
3013 NW 59th ST
Oklahoma City, OK 73112
(405) 843-8835

(800) 575-8835

Hours of Operation

Monday - Friday
8.30AM - 5.00PM

Emergency Service 24/7

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 Nobel Systems, Inc. -  2020  -  No animals were harmed in the making of this site  -  CCTV ID 1613